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The Literary Dram

A Spirit in one hand, a Book in the other

The Whisky:  Hibiki12 Years old

http://www.suntory.com/whisky/en/hibiki/lineup/index.html

The Book:  Snow Country by Yasunari Kawabata

Considering its title, the book might seem a bit out of season, but the weather’s not been the warmest this June. The cherry blossoms arrived late, and the sight of them invariably turns this whisky drinker’s thoughts to Japan.

THE WHISKY

The glass holds amber gold. A luxuriant nose combining a wealth of subtle aromas, integrated layers of flowers and fruit, laced with caramel and honey warmed with citrus zest. On the palate, a host of malty fruit flavours, a little sweet, a little creamy, but with enough fire and spice to keep it unpredictable. Lingers very nicely indeed. Blending at its best. (43% abv)

Part of the experience of this well-crafted whisky is the vessel which holds it. The glass bottle has 24 facets, corresponding to the 24 seasons of the old Japanese lunar calendar. The word Hibiki means ‘resonance’; it embodies harmony. The philosophy of its parent company Suntory is “In Harmony with People and Nature.” Worthy then of the book.

Suntory dates from 1899. In 1923 its owner, Shinjiro Torii, founded Japan’s first whisky distillery, Yamazaki, not far from Kyoto. His inspiration came from the best Scotch and, on a practical level, he employed Masataka Taketsuru, who had travelled to Scotland and gained considerable distilling experience there. Fifty years later Torii’s son, Keizo Saji, expanded Suntory with the construction of a second distillery, Hakushu, in the forests of southern Japan.

Hibiki 12 is a blend of more than 30 whiskies, malt from these two distilleries, as well as grain from Suntory’s lesser known Chita Distillery. Some have been aged in Mizunara, a rare Japanese oak, others in casks previously used to mature plum liqueur, umeshu. The whiskies have been aged a minimum of 12 years, some as much as 30 years. The blended whisky undergoes a process of bamboo charcoal filtering.

Hibiki 12 and its kin, the Hibiki 17, 21, and 30 year olds, have taken blending to a high art in Japan, and their cache of awards from global competitions means they often outclass whatever the rest of the world, including Scotland, has on offer. Japanese whisky is far from a novelty any longer. Hibiki is clear, harmonious evidence of that.

THE BOOK

Snow Country, Nobel winner Yasunari Kawabata‘s 1947 novel, is a story encased by its setting, a mountainous hot springs resort located to the west of the Japan Alps and noted for its heavy snowfalls. Today it is an hour by train from Tokyo. At the time of the story the town was much more isolated, offering a distant escape for a Tokyo man seeking a sensuous respite from his wife and family.

Shimamura is making his second visit there when the novel opens. He is anxious to reunite with Komako, a young geisha still in training, who is both attracted to and wary of the man. She remembers how much she hated to see him leave the first time he visited. But theirs is a tumultuous relationship that never seems to settle long enough to satisfy them both. It allows the reader moments of great tenderness contrasted with impetuous anger fuelled by the woman’s drinking.Through it all we are never certain of Shimamura’s motivation. Does he want companionship or something more? Does he even experience love, either towards his wife or Komako? Why does he return to visit Komako a third time? A distinctly Japanese sensibility overrides the narrative. Admirers of the book often compare it to haiku. Kawabata is not so much telling a story as he is defining a space in which characters and nature interact, slowly unveiling some inner truths.There are exquisite visual moments, all the more powerful for their restraint. The novel deliberately slows the reader and encourages absorbing the narrative one sentence at a time. Think of it as sensual uplift, rather like fine Japanese whisky in a beautifully crafted bottle.

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